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Top 10 Energy Supplements and Energy Boosters

Natural Energy Supplements and Energy Boosters by Purity Select/HGH.com

Are you looking for supplements to help augment your workouts and boost your energy levels? One of the most common health problems revolve around having too little energy. Our products are designed to organically help you increase your body’s HGH and energy levels, while bolstering stamina, enhancing workouts, increasing metabolism, and bettering your overall health.

Below are our top HGH.com supplements designed to help bolster energy.

  1. Somatropinne HGH
  2. HGH Pill 30,000 Nanos
  3. HGH Spray 30,000 Nanos
  4. HGH Testosterone 1500
  5. HGF MAX
  6. DBol-GH
  7. ClenXDV
  8. ANA-GH
  9. Cut and Ripped Plus
  10. DynoAndrol

 

About Purity Select and HGH.com:

HGH.com is an established provider of natural human growth hormone (HGH), bodybuilding and overall health supplements that are designed to benefit consumers naturally through dietary supplementation and provide an alternative to prescription medicine. In 2010, Purity Select acquired HGH.com and continues to offer an exclusive line of supplements for bodybuilding, muscle growth, low testosterone, increased strength, endurance, weight loss, anti-aging, and other health and fitness goals. All Purity Select products are manufactured in the United States through Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) facilities to ensure optimal quality. The company's ongoing commitment to quality, innovation and customer service has positioned Purity Select and HGH.com as leading brands within the bodybuilding supplement industry.

 




HGH.com Shares Top 10 Benefits of Natural Human Growth Hormone (HGH) Supplements

HGH.com Supplements Are Intended to Naturally Boost HGH Levels to Improve Health, Body, Mind and Strength

BOONTON, N.J., Jan. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Human growth hormone (HGH) has been credited with a variety of positive effects on health and wellness; but since injectable HGH can only legally be prescribed for a limited range of health conditions,* many consumers have turned to natural HGH supplements. HGH.com, an established industry leader that manufactures a range of health and bodybuilding supplements in U.S.-based Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) facilities, aims to leverage the advantages of HGH with a range of targeted products.

HGH.com began researching and developing HGH releasers in 1993 and selling over-the-counter supplements through its online storefront in 2003. Today, the company offers a wide array of HGH supplements and conducts ongoing research to drive product improvements.

HGH.com Lists Top 10 Benefits of Their Natural HGH Supplements for 2017:

  • Anti-Aging Supplements: The body's ability to produce HGH declines with age, so boosting HGH levels can help to reverse the visible signs of aging and support optimal physical condition. HGH.com's anti-aging formulations include Somatropinne HGH, HGH 30,000 Nanos pills and spray, HGF Max, Female Hormone Balancer with Sensoril and SkinPerfect Anti-Aging with Collagen.
  • Brain Health Supplements: Because HGH stimulates cell growth and regeneration, it has beneficial effects on the brain and can help improve memory, focus, learning and emotional wellbeing. HGF Max, Somatropinne HGH, and HGH 30,000 Nanos pills and spray all contribute to better brain health.
  • Cartilage Support Supplements: Athletes who engage in strenuous workouts can put a lot of strain on their joints. Consequently, many rely on HGH supplements such as Growth Factor Plus, Cut and Ripped Plus, Somatropinne HGH and HGF Max to promote faster recovery and support healthy joints, cartilage and bones.
  • Energy Boosters/Metabolism Boosters: Energy levels and metabolism often decline with age, so HGH's ability to boost energy, stamina and metabolism can help users maximize the effects of their workouts. Somatropinne HGH, HGH 30,000 Nanos pills and spray, HGH Testosterone, HGF Max, ClenXDV, Ana-GH, DBol-GH, and Cut and Ripped Plus are all formulated to deliver these benefits.
  • Mass Gain: Bodybuilders and athletes frequently turn to HGH supplements to help them quickly build lean mass and muscle. HGH.com's mass builder products include DBol-GH, A-Max 50, Dekka, RoidX Juice, Ana-GH, Cut and Ripped Plus, Somatropinne HGH and HGH Spray 30,000 Nanos.
  • Memory Support: To combat age-related memory loss, many adults take HGH supplements such as Somatropinne HGH, HGF Max, and HGH 30,000 Nanos pills. These products help support healthy brain function and improve memory, focus and sleep.
  • Muscle Growth: One of the reasons HGH releasers are especially popular among bodybuilders is their ability to promote rapid muscle growth. HGH.com muscle builder formulas include Growth Factor Plus, A-Max 50, Dekka, RoidX Juice, HGF Max, Winadrol, ClenXDV, Ana-GH, DBol-H, Cut and Ripped Plus, Somatropinne HGH, and HGH 30,000 Nanos pills and spray.
  • Skin Care, Hair and Nails: Among the key anti-aging effects associated with HGH are improved skin texture, elasticity and moisture, as well as longer and stronger hair and nails. SkinPerfect Hair, Skin and Nails supplements deliver these and other benefits, as do Somatropinne HGH, HGF Max, and HGH 30,000 Nanos pills and spray.
  • Weight Loss Pills: HGH supplements have the ability to boost metabolism and burn fat, helping users achieve rapid weight loss and long-term weight loss. HGH.com offers several formulas that can aid in weight loss, including Hydrox Slim, Female Hormone Balancer with Sensoril, ClenXDV, HGF Max, Somatropinne HGH, and HGH 30,000 Nanos pills and spray.
  • Height Growth Supplements: One of the primary uses of prescription HGH is to treat poor growth and idiopathic short stature in children.* Many adults have sought similar benefits from over-the-counter HGH releasers such as Growth Factor Plus and Somatropinne HGH.

"Our supplements are formulated with natural ingredients that are designed to increase the body's production of HGH, thereby maximizing these benefits," explained Smith. "Thousands of satisfied clients rely on HGH.com products to achieve different health, fitness and bodybuilding goals, and to help keep their mind and body in the best shape possible."

HGH.com is currently offering a special promotion of 20.17% off all orders over $100 with the promo code 2017. Explore the full range of natural HGH, bodybuilding and fitness supplements at http://www.hgh.com.

 

About Purity Select and HGH.com:
HGH.com is an established provider of natural human growth hormone (HGH) bodybuilding and overall health supplements that are designed to benefit consumers naturally through dietary supplementation and provide an alternative to prescription medicine. In 2010, Purity Select acquired HGH.com and continues to offer an exclusive line of supplements for bodybuilding, muscle growth, low testosterone, increased strength, endurance, weight loss, anti-aging, and other health and fitness goals. All Purity Select products are manufactured in the United States through Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) facilities to ensure optimal quality. The company's ongoing commitment to quality, innovation and customer service has positioned Purity Select and HGH.com as leading brands within the bodybuilding supplement industry.

* Drug Enforcement Administration. Human Growth Hormone; fact sheet; August 2013. https://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_chem_info/hgh.pdf

Media Inquiries:
Dan Smith
http://www.hgh.com 

888-399-5993        




Tribulus Terrestris Benefits, Uses, Side Effects and Functions


Discover the Function, Sources and Benefits of the Health Supplement Ingredient Tribulus Terrestris, or Caltrop

Tribulus terrestris – also known as caltrop, devil’s weed, devil’s thorn, puncture vine or simply Tribulus – is a fruit-bearing herb that grows in subtropical regions. Extracts from the plant have long been used in traditional Chinese and Indian Ayurvedic medicine to promote virility and vitality, and to treat health complaints. Today, Tribulus terrestris is often used as an ingredient in health and bodybuilding supplements, such as HGH Testosterone Plus, Anapolan-MAX 50, ClenXDV and RoidX Juice.

Functions of Tribulus Terrestris

Various constituents of the Tribulus terrestris plant are credited with its beneficial properties. Protodioscin, the plant’s primary bioactive component, appears to enhance libido and sexual function by increasing sex hormone levels. Its saponins are believed to have cytotoxic and antihyperlipidemic effects, while tribulosin demonstrates cardioprotective properties. Because Tribulus terrestris may have the potential to increase testosterone levels, some theorize this can translate to a positive impact on body composition and athletic performance.

Sources of Tribulus Terrestris

Native to Asia, Africa and southern Europe, Tribulus terrestris is harvested for its extracts. The plant should not be consumed raw, as its spine-covered fruit is considered unsafe to eat; in fact, some reports indicate that eating Tribulus fruit may cause collapsed lungs. However, its extracts have been used in traditional medicines and natural dietary supplements for many years. Tribulus extracts may be derived from the root, leaf or fruit of the plant.

Tribulus Terrestris Benefits and Uses

In traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurveda, Tribulus terrestris has been used to enhance libido and sexual function, increase energy and strength, and treat a variety of health issues, such as heart problems, chest pain, skin disorders and kidney stones. Preliminary research suggests that Tribulus extract does indeed deliver many potential health benefits, from lowering blood pressure and blood glucose levels to supporting cardiovascular and organ health. It has also been shown to have analgesic (pain-relieving), anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Furthermore, some evidence suggests it may have future potential for treating breast, prostate and UVB-induced skin cancer.

Due to its purported aphrodisiac and erectogenic effects, Tribulus extract is commonly used as an ingredient in supplements designed to enhance male sexual health. It can also be found in bodybuilding supplements that are formulated to improve muscle strength and lean mass; and its cardioprotective and analgesic properties may further benefit those engaged in intense training or exercise.

Side Effects of Tribulus Terrestris and Potential Interactions

Supplements containing Tribulus terrestris extracts are generally considered safe for healthy adults. Some minor side effects have been reported, such as gastrointestinal irritation, gastric reflux and difficulty sleeping. However, individuals with certain medical conditions should exercise caution when taking supplements containing Tribulus extract. Some evidence suggests it may worsen prostate conditions or prostate cancer and can potentially harm fetal development, so men with prostate issues and women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should avoid Tribulus extract.

Because Tribulus terrestris has been shown to lower blood pressure and blood sugar levels, it may cause blood pressure or glucose levels to drop too low if taken in conjunction with antihypertensive drugs or diabetes medication. Tribulus extract can cause more frequent urination, and may increase the effects of other diuretics. Using Tribulus supplements with the blood thinner clopidogrel may increase the risk of blood clots.

More detailed safety information on Tribulus terrestris side effects and interactions can be found on healthcare websites such as WebMD. As with any medication or health supplement, it is best to consult your physician before taking dietary supplements containing Tribulus extract.

Tribulus Terrestris Research and Studies

Numerous studies have examined the health benefits of Tribulus terrestris. Resarch published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, Life Sciences, Ancient Science of Life and Phytotherapy Research support its antihypertensive and cardioprotective effects, while studies published in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences and Indian Journal of Experimental Biology demonstrates its anti-diabetic properties. Its potential as a cancer-fighting agent has been documented in numerous publications, including the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, Journal of Ethnopharmacology, Neoplasma, Pathobiology and Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology.

A review in the Journal of Dietary Supplements attempted to determine the effect of Tribulus terrestris on testosterone concentrations, and reported that a number of animal studies displayed a significant increase in serum testosterone levels after Tribulus administration, but the effect was only noted in humans when Tribulus was administered as part of a combined supplement therapy. However, a pilot study published in the Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy found that men with partial androgen deficiency experienced statistically significant increases in testosterone levels and erectile function following Tribulus supplementation.

Several studies have examined the impact of Tribulus terrestris supplements on athletes. A review published in the Journal of Human Kinetics concluded that there is little reliable data on the usefulness of Tribulus supplements in competitive sports. However, a group of Lithuanian researchers published positive findings in the Fiziolohichnyĭ Zhurnal and Acta Medica Lituanica, reporting that athletes on a 20-day regimen of Tribulus terrestris supplements experienced significant increases in anaerobic alactic muscular power, aerobic capacity and blood testosterone, as well as reduced lactate concentration. In light of the limited and conflicting findings in this area, further clinical studies are needed to definitively support the effects of Tribulus terrestris on the testosterone levels, athletic performance and body composition of athletes and bodybuilders.

For additional Tribulus terrestris research, refer to the PubMed site sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

HGH.com Supplements With Tribulus Terrestris

Athletes, bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts can harness the health benefits of Tribulus terrestris through natural fitness and bodybuilding supplements from HGH.com:

Testosterone Plus – HGH Testosterone Plus features a proprietary blend of Tribulus terrestris, maca, ginkgo biloba, long jack and other natural ingredients that are formulated to help build muscle, boost energy, promote muscle recovery and enhance sexual health.

A-MAX 50 – Anapolan-MAX is designed to support lean muscle gain while increasing testosterone levels and HGH production. In addition to 100mg of Tribulus terrestris extract, the proprietary blend of ingredients in A-MAX 50 includes L-tyrosine, shilajit, cowhage, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and Vitamin E.

ClenXDV – Each serving of ClenXDV contains 200mg of Tribulus terrestris and a proprietary blend of other natural ingredients, including deer antler velvet, DHEA and wild yam. This formulation is intended to help athletes and bodybuilders build muscle, burn fat and lose weight.

RoidX Juice – The combination of ingredients in RoidX Juice is designed to help bodybuilders quickly increase muscle and weight while supporting muscle recovery. RoidX Juice tablets contain a proprietary blend of Tribulus terrestris, shilajit, DHEA, Vitamin E and other select ingredients.

References (Function, Sources, Benefits/Uses and Side Effects/Interactions):

Examine.com. “Tribulus Terrestris”; published under “Supplements”; accessed June 24, 2015.

Freedman, Lisa. “Supplement Guide: Tribulus Terrestris”; Men’s Fitness; accessed June 24, 2015.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. “Tribulus Terrestris”; published under “Integrative Medicine”; last updated June 25, 2015.

WebMD. “Tribulus Terrestris”; article in “Vitamins & Supplements”; reviewed December 27, 2014.

WebMD and Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. “Tribulus”; published under “Vitamins & Supplements”; accessed June 24, 2015.

Research Sources:

Amin, Amr; Mohamed Lotfy; et al. “The Protective Effect of Tribulus Terrestris in Diabetes”; Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; November 2006.

El-Tantawy, W.H. and L.A. Hassanin. “Hypoglycemic and Hypolipidemic Effects of Alcoholic Extract of Tribulus Alatus in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats: A Comparative Study with T. Terrestris (Caltrop)”; Indian Journal of Experimental Biology; September 2007.

Goranova, T.E.; S.S. Bozhanov; et al. “Changes in Gene Expression of CXCR4, CCR7 and BCL2 After Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells With Saponin Extract From Tribulus Terrestris”; Neoplasma; 2015.

Kim, Hye Jin; Jin Chul Kim; et al. “Aqueous Extract of Tribulus Terrestris Linn Induces Cell Growth Arrest and Apoptosis by Down-Regulating NF-κB Signaling in Liver Cancer Cells”; Journal of Ethnopharmacology; June 14, 2011.

Kumar, Manish; Anil Kumar Soni; et al. “Chemopreventive Potential of Tribulus Terrestris Against 7,12-Dimethylbenz (a) Anthracene Induced Skin Papillomagenesis in Mice”; Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention; April-June 2006.

Milašius, Kazys; Rūta Dadelienė; and Juozas Skernevičius. “The Influence of the Tribulus Terrestris Extract on the Parameters of the Functional Preparedness and Athletes’ Organism Homeostasis”; Fiziolohichnyĭ Zhurnal; 2009.

Milašius, Kazys; Marija Pečiukonienė; et al. “Efficacy of the Tribulus Food Supplement Used by Athletes”; Acta Medica Lituanica; 2010.

Murthy, A.R.; S.D. Dubey; and K. Tripathi. “Anti-Hypertensive Effect of Gokshura (Tribulus Terrestris Linn.): A Clinical Study”; Ancient Science of Life; January-April 2000.
<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3336438/pdf/ASL-19-139.pdf>

Phillips, Oludotun A.; Koyippalli T. Mathew; and Mabayoje A. Oriowo. “Antihypertensive and Vasodilator Effects of Methanolic and Aqueous Extracts of Tribulus Terrestris in Rats”; Journal of Ethnopharmacology; April 6, 2006.

Pokrywka, Andrzej; Zbigniew Obmiński; et al. “Insights into Supplements with Tribulus Terrestris used by Athletes”; Journal of Human Kinetics; June 28, 2014.

Qureshi, Ahmed; Declan Naughton; and Andrea Petróczi. “A Systematic Review on the Herbal Extract Tribulus Terrestris and the Roots of Its Putative Aphrodisiac and Performance Enhancing Effect”; Journal of Dietary Supplements; March 2014.

Reshma, P.L.; V.S. Lekshmi; et al. “Tribulus terrestris (Linn.) Attenuates Cellular Alterations Induced by Ischemia in H9c2 Cells Via Antioxidant Potential”; Phytotherapy Research; June 2015.

Roaiah, Mohamed Farid; Yasser Ibrahim El Khayat; et al. “Pilot Study on the Effect of Botanical Medicine (Tribulus Terrestris) on Serum Testosterone Level and Erectile Function in Aging Males With Partial Androgen Deficiency (PADAM)”; Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy; April 7, 2015.

Rogerson, Shane; Christopher J. Riches; et al. “The Effect of Five Weeks of Tribulus Terrestris Supplementation on Muscle Strength and Body Composition During Preseason Training in Elite Rugby League Players”; Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research; May 2007.
<http://www.researchgate.net/publication/6304731_The_effect_of_five_weeks_of_Tribulus_terrestris_supplementation_on_muscle_strength_and_body_composition_during_preseason_training_in_elite_rugby_league_players>

Sharifi, Ali M.; Radbod Darabi; and Nasrin Akbarloo. “Study of Antihypertensive Mechanism of Tribulus Terrestris in 2K1C Hypertensive Rats: Role of Tissue ACE Activity”; Life Sciences; October 24, 2003.

Sisto, Margherita; Sabrina Lisi; et al. “Saponins From Tribulus Terrestris L. Protect Human Keratinocytes From UVB-Induced Damage”; Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology; December 5, 2012.

Wei, S.; H. Fukuharu; et al. “Terrestrosin D, a Steroidal Saponin From Tribulus Terrestris L., Inhibits Growth and Angiogenesis of Human Prostate Cancer in Vitro and in Vivo”; Pathobiology; May 2014.





Cowhage Benefits, Uses, Side Effects and Functions

Discover the Function, Sources and Benefits of the Health Supplement Ingredient Cowhage, or Mucuna Pruriens

Mucuna pruriens – also known as cowhage, cowitch or velvet bean – is a plant that grows in tropic and sub-tropic regions. It is classified as a legume and has seed-producing pods. If the hairy outer covering of the pods touches human skin, it can cause contact dermatitis and severe itching; however, extracts from the plant have long been used in traditional medicine. Today, Mucuna pruriens is often used as an ingredient in health and bodybuilding supplements, such as HGH 30,000 Spray, Somatropinne HGH and Anapolan-MAX 50.

Functions of Cowhage

While Mucuna pruriens is technically classified as a vegetable, its extract is more commonly consumed in the form of medicine or supplements. Cowhage is a good natural source of levodopa, or L-dopa, which in the human body serves as a precursor for the neurotransmitter dopamine. Since L-dopa is used in the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease, cowhage has been widely studied for its potential in this area. In addition, cowhage extract is noted for its anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and antioxidant properties, which are also believed to be due to the presence of L-dopa. And because L-dopa has been shown to stimulate human growth hormone (HGH) secretion and synthesis, some experts believe that the L-dopa in cowhage may act as an HGH releaser.

Sources of Cowhage

Indigenous to southern China and eastern India, Mucuna pruriens is cultivated in Asia, Africa, and parts of North and Central America, as well as the Caribbean and Pacific Islands. The plant is rich in protein and minerals; and in some cultures, cowhage pods and beans are prepared as food. In Mexico and Guatemala, the seeds are roasted and used as a coffee substitute known as “Nescafe” (though there is no relation to the trademarked coffee brand of the same name). However, in the United States, cowhage is most commonly used in extract form as an ingredient in medicines and dietary supplements.

Cowhage Benefits and Uses

As a natural source of L-dopa, cowhage has been most widely studied and used as a treatment for Parkinsonism and Parkinson’s disease. Evidence suggests it may also benefit other dopamine-related conditions, such as tardive dyskinesia. The plant’s L-dopa content has been shown to increase dopamine and testosterone levels in adult males while suppressing prolactin levels, which supports cowhage’s traditional use as an aphrodisiac and fertility enhancer. Studies have also shown it can reduce cortisol levels, which in turn may lower perceived stress levels and contribute to a sense of well-being. Because L-dopa has been shown to stimulate HGH levels, cowhage extract is frequently used as an ingredient in health and bodybuilding supplements, in which it is believed to promote muscle growth and act as a fat-burner.

Numerous other positive effects have been attributed to cowhage extract, including anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, anti-epileptic, anti-microbial and antioxidant properties. Various studies have explored its potential for treating diabetes, skin diseases and other pathologies. Cowhage has also been successfully used as an anti-venom that counters the toxic effects of some snake bites, such as from cobras and other vipers.

Side Effects of Cowhage and Potential Interactions

Supplements containing Mucuna pruriens extract are generally considered safe for healthy adults. Some minor side effects have been reported, such as nausea and a bloated feeling in the abdomen; less common side effects include vomiting, headaches, jitteriness and insomnia. However, individuals with certain medical conditions or anyone taking medications contraindicated for L-dopa should exercise caution when taking supplements containing cowhage extract. L-dopa can cause low blood pressure, lightheadedness and fainting in patients with cardiovascular disease, and it may cause blood sugar levels to drop too low in people with diabetes or hypoglycemia. The L-dopa in cowhage may also worsen some conditions, such as liver disease, melanoma, gastrointestinal ulcers or mental illness. Cowhage supplements should not be taken in conjunction with monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) antidepressants or when taking methyldopa for hypertension. Moderate interactions may occur with other antihypertensive drugs (guanethidine), insulin, diabetes medications, antipsychotic drugs, tricyclic antidepressants or anesthesia.

More detailed safety information on cowhage side effects and interactions can be found on healthcare websites such as WebMD. As with any medication or health supplement, it is best to consult your physician before taking dietary supplements containing cowhage extract.

Cowhage Research and Studies

Numerous studies have examined the pharmacological effects of Mucuna pruriens extract, primarily in relation to its L-dopa content. A 2012 review published in Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine highlights the plant’s medicinal properties and related research findings, many of which are summarized above in the “Cowhage Benefits and Uses” section of this article. Research published in Clinical Neuropharmacology, Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, and the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry have demonstrated the value of cowhage extract in treating the symptoms of Parkinsonism and Parkinson’s disease. In fact, some studies suggest that cowhage extract may have advantages over conventional L-dopa preparations, such as reducing the risk of drug-induced dyskinesia (DID).

Research dating from the early 1970s to present has established that L-dopa has the potential to stimulate HGH secretion and synthesis, as documented in Clinical Interventions in Aging and in several studies published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. One study featured in Nutrition and Metabolic Insights specifically investigated the effects of a Mucuna pruriens (velvet bean) and Chlorophytum borivilianum blend supplement on serum growth hormone levels in exercise-trained men, and found that it produced an increase in circulating HGH levels.

Other studies have indicated that cowhage supplements may contribute to a wide range of health benefits, from treating male infertility to improving sleep quality. Animal studies also suggest that cowhage extract may help reduce blood glucose levels and lower cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids. However, further clinical studies are needed to definitively support these findings and their potential applications in humans.

For additional cowhage research, refer to the PubMed site sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

HGH.com Supplements With Cowhage

Athletes, bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts can harness the health benefits of cowhage through natural fitness and bodybuilding supplements from HGH.com:

HGH 30,000 Nanograms Spray – This convenient HGH spray features a proprietary blend of ingredients designed to stimulate HGH release. In addition to L-dopa from cowhage seed extract, other natural ingredients include GABA, deer antler velvet, long jack and L-group amino acids. HGH 30,000 Spray is formulated to support muscle growth, mass gain, fat burning and other health benefits.

Somatropinne HGH – Purity Select’s natural Somatropinne HGH capsules contain a proprietary blend of plant extracts, including cowhage seeds, maca, hawthorn berry and horny goat weed. As an over-the-counter HGH releaser, this supplement is intended to help athletes build lean muscle and gain increased energy, while also providing weight-loss and anti-aging benefits.

A-MAX 50 – Anapolan-MAX is formulated to support lean muscle gain while increasing HGH production and testosterone levels. In addition to cowhage extract, the proprietary blend of ingredients in A-MAX 50 includes Tribulus terrestris, shilajit, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and L-tyrosine.

References (Function, Sources, Benefits/Uses and Side Effects/Interactions):

Examine.com. “Mucuna Pruriens”; published under “Supplements”; accessed June 16, 2015.

Gonzalez, Adam. “Supplement Spotlight: Get Shredded With Fat Burners”; Muscle & Fitness; accessed June 16, 2015.

Men’s Fitness Editors. “Fat Burner Buyer’s Guide Q&A”; Men’s Fitness; accessed June 16, 2015.

University of Maryland Medical Center. “Mucuna Pruriens”; published under “Complementary and Alternative Medicine Guide”; last reviewed April 8, 2014; accessed June 16, 2015, 2015.

WebMD and Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. “Cowhage”; published under “Vitamins & Supplements”; accessed June 16, 2015.

Research Sources:

Alleman, Rick J., Jr.; Robert E. Canale; et al. “A Blend of Chlorophytum Borivilianum and Velvet Bean Increases Serum Growth Hormone in Exercise-Trained Men”; Nutrition and Metabolic Insights; October 2, 2011.

Chihara, Kazuo; Yoichi Kashio; et al. “L-Dopa Stimulates Release of Hypothalamic Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Humans”; The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism; March 1986.

Dharmarajan, Satheesh Kumar and Kottai Muthu Arumugam. “Comparative Evaluation of Flavone From Mucuna Pruriens and Coumarin From Ionidium Suffruticosum for Hypolipidemic Activity in Rats Fed With High Fat Diet”; Lipids in Health and Disease; October 2012.

Kansal, Prakash C.; John Buse; et al. “The Effect of L-Dopa on Plasma Growth Hormone, Insulin, and Thyroxine”; The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism; January 1972.

Katzenschlager, Regina; Alan C. Evans; et al. “Mucuna Pruriens in Parkinson's Disease: A Double Blind Clinical and Pharmacological Study”; Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry; December 2004.

Lampariello, Lucia Raffaella; Alessio Cortelazzo; et al. “The Magic Velvet Bean of Mucuna Pruriens”; Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine; October-December 2012.

Lieu, Christopher A.; Allen R. Kunselman; et al. “A Water extract of Mucuna Pruriens Provides Long-Term Amelioration of Parkinsonism With Reduced Risk for Dyskinesias”; Parkinsonism & Related Disorders; August 2010.
<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2909380/>

Majekodunmi, Stephen O. Ademola A Oyagbemi; et al. “Evaluation of the Anti-Diabetic Properties of Mucuna Pruriens Seed Extract”; Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine; August 2011.

McCarthy, Cameron G.; Rick J. Alleman; et al. “A Dietary Supplement Containing Chlorophytum Borivilianum and Velvet Bean Improves Sleep Quality in Men and Women”; Integrative Medicine Insights; 2012.

Müller, Thomas; Reiner Hellwig; and Siegfried Muhlack. “Levodopa Induces Synthesis of Nerve Growth Factor and Growth Hormone in Patients With Parkinson Disease”; Clinical Neuropharmacology; May-June 2011.

Shukla, Kamla Kant; Abbas Ali Mahdi; et al. “Mucuna Pruriens Reduces Stress and Improves the Quality of Semen in Infertile Men”; Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine; March 2010.

Tan, Nget Hong; Shin Yee Fung; et al. “The Protective Effect of Mucuna Pruriens Seeds Against Snake Venom Poisoning”; Journal of Ethnopharmacology; June 22, 2009.

Walker, Richard F. “Primary Locus Intervention: A Novel Approach to Treating Age-Associated Hormone Insufficiency”; Clinical Interventions in Aging; December 2007.






Somatotropin/Somatropin Benefits, Uses, Side Effects and Functions

Discover the Function, Sources and Benefits of Somatotropin Supplements and Somatropin Injections

Somatotropin—also known as human growth hormone (HGH) or simply as growth hormone (GH)—is a polypeptide produced by somatotrope cells in the pituitary gland. It supports skeletal growth in children and adolescents, and plays a role in metabolism, body composition, muscle growth and tissue repair in adults. In addition to the somatotropin naturally produced by the body, a synthetic form of HGH called somatropin is available with a doctor’s prescription. Certain health and bodybuilding supplements may also help increase somatotropin production through natural ingredients known as HGH releasers. Many of these ingredients can be found in the proprietary-blend formulas of Somatropinne HGH, Growth Factor Plus, HGH 30,000 Nanograms, A-MAX 50, and HGF MAX, among others.

Functions of Somatotropin

Children and adolescents require somatotropin for proper growth and development; those with an HGH deficiency may require somatropin injections to achieve normal height. In adults, somatotropin helps maintain healthy tissues and organs. It can also increase bone density, muscle mass, and protein synthesis as well as decrease body fat and improve exercise capacity. Because HGH production naturally declines with age, some adults take somatotropin-boosting supplements to enhance their athletic performance and combat the physical signs of aging.

Sources of Somatotropin/Somatropin

For most individuals, the primary source of somatotropin is the body’s endogenous production by the somatotropic cells of the pituitary gland. The body produces its highest levels of somatotropin during childhood and adolescence; these levels significantly decline when the individual reaches full adult height. Scientists have also developed a synthetic form of somatotropin known as somatropin or somatrem, using E. coli or mammalian cells to create therapeutic proteins in a laboratory setting. Somatropin is chemically identical to the somatotropin that is produced by the pituitary gland and administered by subcutaneous injection. It is a regulated substance, which means it can only be legally prescribed for FDA-approved uses.

Since somatropin injections are not legally available to healthy adults, those seeking the benefits of somatotropin may opt to take natural supplements that are designed to boost the body’s own HGH production. Certain amino acids are recognized as natural HGH releasers—including GABA, arginine, ornithine, glutamine, lysine, tyrosine and glycine—so dietary supplements containing these ingredients may help increase somatotropin levels.

Somatropin Benefits and Uses

The pituitary gland’s secretion of somatotropin supports bodily growth and development throughout childhood and adolescence, so the most common reason for prescribing somatropin is to treat children and teens with HGH deficiency or specific medical conditions. FDA-approved pediatric uses of somatropin include idiopathic growth hormone deficiency, Noonan syndrome, Turner syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, chronic renal insufficiency, short stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX) deficiency, and idiopathic short stature.

Although HGH levels naturally decline with age, somatotropin continues to play a role throughout adulthood—helping to regulate metabolism and protein synthesis and promoting organ, tissue and bone health. Somatropin may be legally prescribed to adults who have severe HGH deficiency, which normally occurs due to a pituitary adenoma (tumor) or adenoma-related surgery or radiation treatments. It is also sometimes prescribed to prevent or minimize wasting in AIDS patients.

Somatropin injections can improve bone density, muscle mass and exercise capacity in adults with HGH deficiency, and they can produce similar outcomes in healthy adults. As a result, some bodybuilders and athletes take somatropin to enhance their athletic performance and physique. However, it should be noted that somatropin cannot legally be prescribed for such purposes. Furthermore, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), International Olympic Committee and numerous sports organizations have banned the use of HGH injections among athletes.

Given the potential repercussions associated with illegal somatropin injections, many bodybuilders, athletes and aging adults have starting taking natural HGH supplements to help the body increase its own somatotropin production. Proponents of somatotropin-boosting supplements report that these natural HGH releasers have helped them develop lean muscle, improve their strength and endurance, and recover from intense workouts and injuries more quickly. They also credit HGH supplements with enhancing their body composition and slowing the visible signs of aging.

Somatropin Side Effects

Individuals considering HGH injections should be aware of somatropin side effects and interactions. Some users have experienced an allergic reaction, with symptoms such as itching or rashes, chest pain, difficulty breathing, or swelling of the face, tongue, or throat. Other possible side effects include headaches, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, fluid retention, swelling of the hands or feet, muscle stiffness or pain, and burning, tingling or numbness in the skin. Somatropin may increase the risk of developing diabetes, cancer or pancreatitis, and it can cause dislocation of the hipbone that results in limping or knee/hip pain. Interactions have been recorded when somatropin is used with estrogen hormone replacement or glucocorticoids (such as prednisone or hydrocortisone), and somatropin can cause adverse effects in patients with diabetes, scoliosis, kidney disease and certain other medical conditions.

Somatotropin-boosting HGH supplements tend to have fewer and less severe side effects than somatropin injections; however, the side effects and interactions will vary depending on the supplement’s ingredients.

More detailed safety information on somatropin side effects, interactions and precautions can be found on the Mayo Clinic website. For natural somatotropin-boosting supplements, refer to the relevant ingredient articles on HGH.com to learn about potential side effects and interactions. As with any medication or health supplement, it is best to consult your physician before using somatropin injections or natural HGH supplements.

Somatotropin/Somatropin Research and Studies

Researchers have conducted numerous studies on both the natural and synthetic forms of somatotropin. Visit the PubMed site sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to explore the latest somatotropin research and somatropin studies. For research on specific ingredients that have been shown to boost somatotropin levels, refer to the corresponding ingredient articles on the HGH.com blog.

You will discover there is a wealth of information on at HGH.com. We recently posted this related blog post on HGH/somatotropin: Human Growth Hormone (HGH) Benefits, Uses, Side Effects and Functions.

HGH.com Supplements With Natural Somatotropin/HGH Releasers

Many of the health and bodybuilding supplements available from HGH.com are formulated to naturally increase somatotropin/HGH levels. These products include:

Somatropinne HGH – Purity Select’s natural Somatropinne HGH capsules contain a proprietary blend of L-arginine, cowhage, maca and horny goat weed. As an over-the-counter somatotropin releaser, this supplement is formulated to help athletes gain lean muscle and increased energy while also providing weight-loss and anti-aging benefits.

HGH 30,000 Nanograms Pills and HGH 30,000 Nanograms Spray –Purity Select’s 30,000 Nanogram HGH pills and spray are designed to promote somatotropin production, muscle growth, increased energy and other health benefits. They contain a powerful combination of amino acids—including L-glutamine, L-arginine, L-ornithine, L-lysine, L-glycine, L-valine and L-tyrosine —as well as other natural ingredients such as colostrum, GABA, cowhage (mucuna pruriens), long jack and deer antler velvet.

Growth Factor Plus – As its name suggests, Growth Factor Plus is intended to support height growth as well as bone and joint health. Its proprietary blend of ingredients features amino acids such as L-arginine, L-ornithine, L-lysine, L-glycine, L-glutamine, and L-tyrosine.

HGF MAX – Purity Select HGF MAX is intended to boost somatotropin production, improve muscle tone, build muscle, promote fat loss, boost energy and increase metabolism. Its proprietary blend of ingredients includes arginine, GABA, glutamine, lysine, glycine, tyrosine, ornithine and deer antler velvet.

Ana-GH – These capsules contain a blend of L-group amino acids such as L-leucine and L-valine as well as plant-based ingredients such as horny goat weed and maca. Ana-GH is intended to jumpstart bulking cycles by promoting muscle mass and weight gains, improving protein synthesis, and contributing to joint and muscle repair.

Anapolan-MAX 50 (A-MAX 50) – Anapolan-MAX is formulated to support lean muscle gain while boosting somatotropin production and testosterone levels. Its proprietary blend of ingredients includes L-tyrosine, Tribulus terrestris, cowhage (mucuna pruriens), shilajit and dehydroepiandrosterone.

ClenXDV – Featuring a proprietary blend of DHEA, deer antler velvet, wild yam, Tribulus terrestris and other natural ingredients, ClenXDV is intended to help athletes and bodybuilders build muscle, lose weight and burn fat.

DBol-GH – This anabolic lean muscle gainer is designed to promote lean mass and muscle growth, support muscle recovery and naturally boost HGH levels with a proprietary blend of ingredients that include bovine colostrum, beta-ecdysterone, L-valine and L-leucine.

Dekka – With a blend of Korean ginseng root, yucca bark, wild yam root, and dehydroepiandrosterone, Dekka capsules are formulated to help bodybuilders achieve lean mass, weight gain, muscle building and bulking.

Testosterone Plus – HGH Testosterone Plus features a proprietary blend of long jack, maca, Tribulus terrestris, ginkgo biloba and other natural ingredients that are intended to help build muscle, aid in muscle recovery and boost energy while offering sexual health benefits such as improved libido and stamina.

RoidX Juice – The ingredients in RoidX Juice are designed to help bodybuilders quickly develop muscle and gain weight in addition to supporting muscle recovery. RoidX Juice capsules contain a proprietary blend of Vitamin E, Tribulus terrestris, shilajit and dehydroepiandrosterone.

Winstrol Max – Optimized for cutting cycles, Winstrol Max is formulated to promote lean mass gain and help athletes achieve ripped abs. Its powerful blend of ingredients includes L-group amino acids such as leucine, arginine and valine as well as oat straw (Avena sativa) extract and saw palmetto.

References:

Drug Enforcement Administration. “Human Growth Hormone”; DEA fact sheet; August 2013. <http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_chem_info/hgh.pdf>

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). “Somatropin Information”; published under “Drug Safety and Availability”; August 4, 2011. <http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/PostmarketDrugSafetyInformationforPatientsandProviders/ucm237839.htm>

Kamionka, Mariusz. “Engineering of Therapeutic Proteins Production in Escherichia Coli”; Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology; February 2011. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3179032>

Mayo Clinic. “Somatropin, E-Coli Derived (Subcutaneous Route, Injection Route)”; Mayo Clinic website; last updated April 1, 2015. <http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/somatropin-e-coli-derived-subcutaneous-route-injection-route/description/drg-20071575>

Mayo Clinic. “Somatropin, Mammalian Derived (Injection Route, Subcutaneous Route)”; Mayo Clinic website; last updated April 1, 2015. <http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/somatropin-mammalian-derived-injection-route-subcutaneous-route/description/drg-20071668>

WebMD. “Somatropin Injection”; accessed June 9, 2015. <http://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-6259/somatropin-injection/details>





Human Growth Hormone (HGH) Benefits, Uses, Side Effects and Functions

Discover the Function, Sources and Benefits of Human Growth Hormone, or HGH, Supplements

Human growth hormone (HGH)—also known as somatotropin or simply as growth hormone (GH)—is a polypeptide hormone that is produced by the pituitary gland. It promotes growth in children and adolescents, and plays a role in body composition, metabolism, muscle growth and tissue repair in adults. Beyond the human growth hormones naturally produced by the body, synthetic HGH—or recombinant HGH—is manufactured in laboratories and may be obtained with a doctor’s prescription. Select health and bodybuilding supplements may also help boost human growth hormone levels with natural ingredients known as HGH releasers or HGH secretagogues. Many of these ingredients may be found in products such as HGH 30,000 Nanograms, Somatropinne HGH, Ana-GH, DBol-GH and Growth Factor Plus, among others.

Functions of Human Growth Hormone

HGH is required to support proper growth and development in children and adolescents, and it also plays a role in adult metabolism. Human growth hormone may help increase muscle mass, bone density, exercise capacity and protein synthesis, and may decrease body fat. It also helps maintain healthy tissues and organs. Since human growth hormone production naturally declines with age, many believe that HGH supplementation may help improve athletic performance and provide anti-aging benefits in adults.

Sources of HGH

As previously noted, the primary source of human growth hormone is the pituitary gland. HGH production peaks during childhood and adolescence, and substantially declines once full adult height is attained. Laboratory-manufactured synthetic HGH—also known as recombinant HGH, somatropin or somatrem—is another source of growth hormone available to some individuals. This injectable form of HGH may be prescribed to children and some adults that have been diagnosed with human growth hormone deficiency or specific medical conditions. Synthetic HGH is a regulated substance and may only legally be prescribed for FDA-approved uses. These include Turner’s syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, chronic renal insufficiency and idiopathic short stature in children, as well as HGH deficiency and AIDS-related wasting in adults.

Since recombinant HGH is not legally available to healthy adults, many individuals rely on natural HGH supplements that are formulated to increase their body’s own production of human growth hormone. A number of amino acids are recognized as natural HGH releasers. These include L-arginine, L-glutamine, L-glycine, L-lysine, L-ornithine, L-tyrosine and GABA.

Human Growth Hormone Benefits and Uses

The main purpose of HGH is to support human growth and development during childhood and adolescence, and this is the most common reason synthetic HGH is prescribed to young patients. However, human growth hormone continues to play a role throughout adulthood; it helps to regulate metabolism and protein synthesis and supports bone, tissue and organ health. Recombinant HGH may be legally prescribed to adults who have severe HGH deficiency, which typically results from a pituitary adenoma (tumor) or treatment of an adenoma with surgery or radiotherapy. Synthetic growth hormone is also sometimes prescribed to treat the wasting syndrome that may occur in individuals with AIDS.

Human growth hormone injections may increase muscle mass, bone density and exercise capacity in adults with HGH deficiency, and it may produce similar effects in healthy adults. For this reason, some athletes and bodybuilders take recombinant HGH to improve their physique and athletic performance, even though it cannot legally be prescribed for such purposes and is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), International Olympic Committee and numerous sports organizations.

In light of the controversy and legal restrictions surrounding injectable HGH, a growing number of athletes, bodybuilders and aging adults have turned to natural HGH supplements that may help boost the pituitary gland’s secretion of human growth hormone. Many report that L-group amino acids and other natural HGH releasers have helped them build lean muscle, enhance bodily strength, increase athletic endurance, tone their physique, recover faster from intense workouts and injuries, and minimize or reverse the visible signs of aging.

HGH Side Effects

Synthetic human growth hormone injections are associated with a number of side effects that may range widely in severity. Among the more serious HGH side effects some patients have experienced are atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), hypertension (high blood pressure), and abnormal growth of bones and internal organs such as the heart, kidneys, and liver. HGH may also increase the risk of developing diabetes and may cause cancerous tumors to grow in size. Other human growth hormone side effects include: edema (swelling caused by excess fluid in tissues); carpal tunnel syndrome; joint, muscle or nerve pain; numbness or tingling sensations in the skin; headaches; dizziness; blurred vision; chest pain; irregular heartbeat; and a rash or itching near the injection site.

Natural HGH supplements, in general, tend to have fewer and less severe side effects than synthetic growth hormone injections; however, the side effects and interactions will vary depending on the ingredients.

More detailed safety information on synthetic HGH side effects maybe found on the Mayo Clinic website under the “Growth Hormone (Parenteral Route)” entry. As with any medication or health supplement, it is best to consult your physician before using synthetic human growth hormone injections or HGH supplements.

HGH Research and Studies

A wide body of research exists on human growth hormones, including naturally produced HGH, recombinant HGH and ingredients that function as HGH releasers. Refer to the PubMed site sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for an overview of the latest HGH research or to search for articles highlighting the results of human growth hormone studies. For research on specific ingredients that function as HGH releasers, refer to the relevant ingredient articles on the HGH.com blog.

HGH.com Supplements With Natural HGH Releasers

Many of the health and bodybuilding supplements available from HGH.com are formulated to naturally increase HGH levels. These products include:

HGH Pills and HGH Spray – Available as HGH pills or an oral spray, Purity Select’s 30,000 Nanogram products are designed to promote human growth hormone production, muscle growth, increased energy. They contain a powerful combination of L-group amino acids—including L-arginine, L-glutamine, L-glycine, L-lysine, L-ornithine, L-tyrosine and L-valine—and other natural ingredients, such as colostrum, cowhage (mucuna pruriens), deer antler velvet, GABA and long jack.

Growth Factor Plus – As its name implies, Growth Factor Plus is intended to promote height growth while also supporting bone and joint health. Its proprietary blend of ingredients features L-group amino acids such as L-arginine, L-glutamine, L-glycine, L-lysine, L-ornithine and L-tyrosine.

Somatropinne HGH – Purity Select’s natural Somatropinne HGH capsules contain a proprietary blend of plant extracts, including maca, cowhage and horny goat weed as well as L-arginine. As an over-the-counter HGH releaser, this supplement is formulated to help athletes gain lean muscle and increased energy while also providing weight-loss and may minimize the signs of aging.

HGF MAX – Purity Select HGF MAX is intended to boost HGH production, improve muscle tone, build muscle, promote fat loss, boost energy and increase metabolism. Its proprietary blend of ingredients includes GABA, L-arginine, L-glutamine, L-glycine, L-lysine, L-ornithine, L-tyrosine and deer antler velvet.

Ana-GH – Each serving of Ana-GH contains L-group amino acids such as L-leucine and L-valine as well as other natural ingredients, including maca and horny goat weed. This supplement is intended to jumpstart bulking cycles by promoting muscle mass and weight gains, improving protein synthesis, and contributing to joint and muscle repair.

Anapolan-MAX 50 (A-MAX 50) – Anapolan MAX is formulated to support lean muscle gain while boosting HGH production and testosterone levels. Its proprietary blend of ingredients includes L-tyrosine, shilajit, Tribulus terrestris, cowhage (mucuna pruriens) and dehydroepiandrosterone.

ClenXDV – Featuring a proprietary blend of Tribulus terrestris, wild yam, deer antler velvet, DHEA and other natural ingredients, ClenXDV is intended to help athletes and bodybuilders build muscle, lose weight and burn fat.

DBol-GH – This anabolic lean muscle gainer is designed to promote lean mass and muscle growth, support muscle recovery and naturally boost HGH levels with a proprietary blend of ingredients that include beta-ecdysterone, L-leucine, L-valine and bovine colostrum.

Dekka – With a blend of wild yam root, yucca bark, Korean ginseng root and dehydroepiandrosterone, these capsules are formulated to help bodybuilders achieve weight gain, lean mass, bulking and muscle building.

Testosterone Plus – HGH Testosterone Plus features a proprietary blend of maca, long jack, ginkgo biloba, Tribulus terrestris and other natural ingredients that are intended to help build muscle, aid in muscle recovery and boost energy while offering sexual health benefits such as improved libido and stamina.

RoidX Juice – The ingredients in RoidX Juice are designed to help bodybuilders quickly gain muscle and weight while supporting muscle recovery. RoidX Juice capsules contain a proprietary blend of shilajit, Tribulus terrestris, Vitamin E and dehydroepiandrosterone.

Winstrol Max – Optimized for cutting cycles, Winstrol Max is formulated to promote lean mass gain and help athletes achieve ripped abs. Its powerful blend of ingredients includes L-group amino acids such as L-arginine, L-leucine and L-valine as well as saw palmetto and oat straw (Avena sativa) extract.

References:

Drug Enforcement Administration. “Human Growth Hormone”; DEA fact sheet; August 2013. <http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_chem_info/hgh.pdf>

Dunkin, Mary Anne. “Human Growth Hormone (HGH)”; WebMD; December 30, 2014. <http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/human-growth-hormone-hgh>

Fordyce, Tom. “Human Growth Hormone Explained”; BBC Sport; July 27, 2003. <http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/front_page/3101343.stm>

Jackson, Joe. “Unlock Your Potential: How to Boost Your HGH Levels”; Men’s Fitness; accessed June 5, 2015. <http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/supplements/unlock-your-potential-how-to-boost-your-hgh-levels>

Mayo Clinic. “Drugs and Supplements: Growth Hormone (Parenteral Route)”; May Clinic website; last updated April, 2015. <http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/growth-hormone-parenteral-route/description/drg-20069416>

Mayo Clinic Staff. “Human Growth Hormone: Does It Slow Aging?”; Mayo Clinic website; February 1, 2014. <http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/in-depth/growth-hormone/art-20045735>

Mayo Clinic Staff. “Performance-Enhancing Drugs: Know the Risks”; Mayo Clinic website; December 12, 2012. <http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/performance-enhancing-drugs/art-20046134>




Maca Benefits, Uses, Side Effects and Functions

Discover the Function, Sources and Benefits of the Health Supplement Ingredient Maca, or Lepidium Meyenii

Maca – also known as Lepidium meyenii or Lepidium peruvianum – is a plant that is native to Peru and found in the high Andes. While it is sometimes called “Peruvian ginseng,” maca is not related to the ginseng plant; rather, it is a cruciferous root vegetable in the same family as mustard, broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage. Maca extract or powder is often used as an ingredient in select health and bodybuilding supplements, such as Somatropinne HGH, Ana-GH and Testosterone Plus.

Functions of Maca

The nutritional value of maca has long been recognized in both traditional and modern cultures, and these nutritional properties underlie maca’s reputation for enhancing energy, strength and endurance. Powdered maca is estimated to contain 59% carbohydrates, 8.5% fiber and more than 10% protein. It is also a good source of vitamins and essential amino acids, and is particularly high in iron and Vitamin C. Maca has been shown to improve sexual performance and fertility in both animals and humans. Its fertility-enhancing effects are believed to result from aromatic isothiocyanates hydrolyzed from glucosinolates, while its libido-boosting properties are attributed to the prostaglandins, sterols and amides of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Maca also supports the immune system and overall health through its antiviral and antioxidant properties.

Sources of Maca

Maca is grown and harvested in the Peruvian Andes, which is generally the only place where fresh maca is consumed. In Peru, the root may be roasted or boiled; it is often made into a porridge (mazamorra) and its flour is used for bread, cakes and pancakes. Maca root is also used in a fermented beverage known as macha chicha, and its leaves may be eaten either raw or cooked. Outside of its immediate growing region, maca root is typically sold dried, in powder/flour form or as gelatinized maca. Supplements may contain extracts made from dried roots, maca flour or gelatinized maca.

Maca Benefits and Uses

As a food source or dietary supplement, maca has excellent nutritional value that may help increase energy, strength and endurance. It also promotes overall health and wellbeing through its antiviral and antioxidant activity. One of the most common uses of maca is to support sexual health; it has been documented to have aphrodisiacal and fertility-enhancing properties, including increased sperm count and motility in males. Some studies have indicated maca can improve menopausal symptoms, and reduce blood pressure and depression in postmenopausal women.

Side Effects of Maca and Potential Interactions

Maca supplements are generally considered safe for healthy adults; no side effects or interactions have been reported at dosages of up to 3 grams per day. However, some medical professionals advise women with hormone-sensitive conditions to avoid using maca, since it can potentially worsen breast cancer, ovarian cancer, uterine cancer, uterine fibroids or endometriosis.

More detailed safety information on maca side effects and interactions can be found on WebMD. As with any medication or health supplement, it is best to consult your physician before taking dietary supplements containing maca.

Maca Research and Studies

Numerous studies have examined maca’s effects on various medical conditions as well as its impact on overall health and athletic performance. While further clinical research is needed to evaluate its effectiveness for many of these uses, animal and human studies have strongly supported maca’s aphrodisiacal and fertility-enhancing effects.

Two separate animal studies published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology explored maca’s impact on the sexual health of rats; their findings revealed that maca improved several measures of sexual behavior while black maca increased daily sperm counts and sperm motility. Other research has shown that maca has similar effects on humans. An article in the Asian Journal of Andrology reported that maca increased seminal volume, sperm count per ejaculum, motile sperm count and sperm motility in adult men. BioMed Central (BMC) Complementary & Alternative Medicine published a systematic review of random clinical trials; the authors found that maca improved sexual performance in patients with erectile dysfunction and had a significant positive effect on sexual dysfunction or sexual desire in healthy menopausal women or healthy adult men.

Beyond its abilities to increase sexual desire and performance, maca has been shown to benefit women in several ways. A systematic review published in Maturitas reported that maca demonstrated favorable effects on menopausal symptoms, while a study featured in Climacteric noted significant decreases in blood pressure and depression in postmenopausal women. Furthermore, maca was also found to have an antidepressant effect on mice exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress, according to research featured in the Journal of Medicinal Food.

Many believe that maca has positive effects on athletic performance, metabolism and post-workout recovery, though further clinical trials are needed to conclusively support these benefits. One study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology investigated maca’s effect on the sexual desire and athletic performance of trained male cyclists, and determined that maca supplementation improved both sexual desire and cycling time trial performance. An animal study published in Plant Foods for Human Nutrition stated that maca polysaccharides had a positive effect on lipid and glucose metabolism in rats – significantly decreasing the levels of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), low density lipoproteins (LDL) and total cholesterol; lowering the level of triacylglycerols in the plasma, VLDL and liver; and reducing glucose levels in blood.

Finally, several studies have shown that maca supports the immune system and overall health through its antiviral and antioxidant properties. The Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine reported that maca exhibits antiviral activity against human influenza type A and B viruses (Flu-A and Flu-B), “providing remarkable therapeutic benefits.” Maca’s antioxidant activity has been recorded in numerous publications, including Carbohydrate Polymers and Food Chemistry.

For additional Maca research, refer to the PubMed site sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

HGH.com Supplements With Maca

Athletes, bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts can take advantage of maca’s nutritional and health benefits through natural fitness and bodybuilding supplements from HGH.com:

Somatropinne HGH – Purity Select’s natural Somatropinne HGH capsules contain a proprietary blend of plant extracts. As an over-the-counter HGH releaser, this supplement is formulated to help athletes build lean muscle and gain increased energy. It is also designed to provide weight-loss and anti-aging benefits.

Ana-GH – Each serving of Ana-GH contains L-group amino acids and other natural ingredients, including maca and horny goat weed. This supplement is intended to jumpstart bulking cycles by promoting muscle mass and weight gains while improving protein synthesis and contributing to joint and muscle repair.

Testosterone Plus – Purity Select’s HGH Testosterone Plus features a proprietary blend of maca, long jack, ginkgo biloba and other natural ingredients. These capsules are formulated to help build muscle, aid in muscle recovery and boost energy while delivering sexual health benefits such as improved libido and stamina.

References (Function, Sources, Benefits/Uses and Side Effects/Interactions):

Balick, Michael J. and Roberta Lee. “Maca: From Traditional Food Crop to Energy and Libido Stimulant”; Alternative Therapies; March/April 2002. <http://sciweb.nybg.org/science2/pdfs/mb/Maca_Mar_Apr_2002.pdf>

Bruno, Gene. “Maca”; Smart Supplementation, published by Huntington College of Health Sciences; 2000. <http://www.hchs.edu/literature/Maca.pdf>

Examine.com. “Maca”; published under “Supplements”; accessed May 26, 2015. <http://examine.com/supplements/Maca>

Johannes, Laura. “Maca: Can a Root Boost Energy and Sex Drive?”; The Wall Street Journal; December 22, 2014. <http://www.wsj.com/articles/maca-can-a-root-boost-energy-and-sex-drive-1419275240>

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. “Maca”; published under “About Herbs, Botanicals & Other Products” within Integrative Medicine area of website; last updated April 20, 2013; accessed May 26, 2015. <https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/integrative-medicine/herbs/maca>

WebMD and Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. “Maca”; published under “Vitamins & Supplements”; accessed May 26, 2015. <http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-555-maca.aspx?activeIngredientId=555&activeIngredientName=maca&source=1>

Research Sources:

Ai, Zhong; Ai-Fang Cheng; et al. “Antidepressant-Like Behavioral, Anatomical, and Biochemical Effects of Petroleum Ether Extract from Maca (Lepidium Meyenii) in Mice Exposed to Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress”; Journal of Medicinal Food; May 2014. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24730393>

Cicero, A.F.G.; E. Bandieri; and R. Arletti. “Lepidium Meyenii Walp. Improves Sexual Behaviour in Male Rats Independently From Its Action on Spontaneous Locomotor Activity”; Journal of Ethnopharmacology; May 2001. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11297856>

del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Tomàs Pumarolab; et al. “Antiviral Activity of Maca (Lepidium Meyenii) Against Human Influenza Virus”; Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine; September 2014. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25312160>

Gonzales, Carla; Julio Rubio; et al. “Effect of Short-Term and Long-Term Treatments With Three Ecotypes of Lepidium Meyenii (MACA) on Spermatogenesis in Rats”; Journal of Ethnopharmacology; February 20, 2006. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16174556>

Gonzales, Gustavo F.; Amanda Cordova; et al. “Lepidium Meyenii (Maca) Improved Semen Parameters in Adult Men”; Asian Journal of Andrology; December 2001. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11753476>

Lee, Myeong Soo; Byung-Cheul Shin; et al. “Maca (Lepidium Meyenii) for Treatment of Menopausal Symptoms: A Systematic review”; Maturitas; November 2011. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21840656>

Sandoval, Manuel; Nataly N. Okuhama; et al. “Antioxidant Activity of the Cruciferous Vegetable Maca (Lepidium Meyenii)”; Food Chemistry; November 2002. <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814602001334>

Shin, Byung-Cheul; Myeong Soo Lee; et al. “Maca (L. Meyenii) for Improving Sexual Function: A Systematic Review”; BioMed Central (BMC) Complementary & Alternative Medicine; August 6, 2010. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20691074>

Stojanovska, Lily; C. Law; et al. “Maca Reduces Blood Pressure and Depression, in a Pilot Study in Postmenopausal Women”; Climacteric; February 2015. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24931003>

Stone, Mark; Alvin Ibarra; et al. “A Pilot Investigation Into the Effect of Maca Supplementation on Physical Activity and Sexual Desire in Sportsmen”; Journal of Ethnopharmacology; December 10, 2009. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19781622>

Večeřa, Rostislav; Jan Orolin; et al. “The Influence of Maca (Lepidium Meyenii) on Antioxidant Status, Lipid and Glucose Metabolism in Rat”; Plant Foods for Human Nutrition; June 2007. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17333395>

Zha, Shenghua; Qingsheng Zhao; et al. “Extraction, Purification and Antioxidant Activities of the Polysaccharides From Maca (Lepidium Meyenii)”; Carbohydrate Polymers; October 13, 2014. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25037390>






GABA Benefits, Uses, Side Effects and Functions

Discover the Function, Sources and Benefits of the Health Supplement Ingredient Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, or GABA

Gamma-aminobutyric acid, more commonly known as GABA, is a non-protein amino acid that functions as a neurotransmitter. GABA and its precursor, glutamate, are the most abundant neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, particularly in the cerebral cortex. Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter while GABA is an inhibitory neurotransmitter, so their actions are complementary. In addition to being produced within the body, GABA is also available as an ingredient in select health and bodybuilding supplements such as HGF MAX and HGH 30,000 Nanograms spray.

Functions of GABA

As an inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA balances the excitatory effect of glutamate in the developed brain and helps to control cortical stimulation. Due to this action, GABA can have a calming or tranquilizing effect, including anxiolytic and anti-convulsive properties. Evidence suggests it may also stimulate human growth hormone (HGH) production, thereby serving as a natural HGH releaser.

Sources of GABA

GABA is produced by the body, where it is synthesized from glutamate through decarboxylation. While GABA is not naturally found in fresh foods, it can be created through lactobacillus fermentation; therefore, GABA may be consumed in fermented foods such as kimchi, sauerkraut, tempeh, miso, kefir and yogurt, as well as in GABA-fortified foods. In addition, foods that contain GABA’s precursors—glutamic acid or L-glutamine—can help boost GABA levels. Dietary sources of glutamate/glutamine include whole grains, brown rice, beef liver, pork, halibut, mackerel, lentils, broccoli, bananas and tree nuts. Vitamins B-6 and B-12 are required for GABA synthesis, so taking these vitamins may help support GABA production. Finally, GABA may also be consumed orally as an ingredient in natural dietary supplements.

GABA Benefits and Uses

Evidence has shown that GABA may help treat hypertension, so it is sometimes used in medications that are designed to lower blood pressure. The method of action appears to be due to GABA’s ability to suppress the sympathetic nervous activity that leads to high blood pressure. GABA’s anticonvulsant properties suggest that it may be effective in reducing the frequency of seizures in some individuals, while its calming effects may help reduce stress, relieve anxiety, elevate mood, and improve focus and concentration.

A number of studies have indicated that GABA may act as a natural HGH releaser, or HGH secretagogue. In light of its potential to stimulate HGH production, GABA-containing supplements are often taken to support lean muscle growth, decrease body fat and enhance exercise tolerance. Furthermore, GABA is believed to have an analgesic effect, so it may help to alleviate feelings of pain or soreness after an intense workout.

Side Effects of GABA and Potential Interactions

GABA supplementation is generally considered safe for healthy adults; no side effects have been reported at commonly administered dosages. However, since GABA has been shown to reduce blood pressure, supplements containing GABA may increase the risk of hypotension (abnormally low blood pressure) when taken in conjunction with antihypertensive drugs.

More detailed safety information on GABA side effects and interactions can be found in the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database (subscription required). As with any medication or health supplement, it is best to consult your physician before taking dietary supplements containing GABA.

GABA Research and Studies

Many researchers have explored the use of GABA to treat medical conditions such as hypertension and anxiety. Numerous animal and human studies—including some published in the British Journal of Nutrition, Journal of Physiological Anthropology, Clinical and Experimental Hypertension, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, and Transgenic Research—have revealed GABA’s ability to lower blood pressure in cases of hypertension. Other studies have demonstrated its relaxing, immunity-enhancing and anti-anxiety effects. According to an article in BioFactors, GABA not only induces relaxation but also reduces anxiety; and evidence suggests it may enhance immunity under stress conditions. An animal study published Neuroscience found that GABA decreases anxiety-like behavior in rats. Furthermore, researchers documented GABA’s neuroprotective effects in the Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, which reported that GABA-producing Lactobacillus buchneri protected neuronal cells against neurotoxicant-induced cell death. Some researchers have explored the potential of GABA to be used in an analgesic capacity for pain relief—as described in Advances in Pharmacology, Neurochemical Research and the European Journal of Pharmacology—though further evidence is needed to accurately evaluate its effectiveness for this use.

Multiple studies have indicated that GABA is capable of promoting human growth hormone (HGH) secretion; relevant findings have been published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Acta Endocrinologica, Medicine and Sport Science, and other journals and textbooks. One study featured in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise examined the effect of GABA ingestion on immunoreactive growth hormone (irGH) and immunofunctional growth hormone (ifGH) release at rest and after exercise, and found that GABA elevates both resting and post-exercise HGH concentrations. Bodybuilders and athletes often take GABA supplements to help increase muscle growth, enhance muscle tone, burn fat and improve exercise tolerance. However, while GABA has been shown to stimulate HGH secretion, further clinical studies are needed to prove a direct correlation between GABA and other purported health and fitness benefits.

For additional GABA research, refer to the PubMed site sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

HGH.com Supplements With GABA

Athletes, bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts can leverage the potential benefits of GABA through natural health and bodybuilding supplements from HGH.com:

HGF MAX – Purity Select HGF MAX is intended to boost HGH production with a proprietary blend of ingredients, including GABA and key amino acids. This powerful dietary supplement can help improve muscle tone, build muscle, promote fat loss, boost energy and increase metabolism.

HGH Spray – HGH 30,000 Nanograms is designed to stimulate HGH release through a combination of GABA, L-group amino acids and other natural ingredients. Available in a convenient spray form, this product is formulated to support muscle growth, mass gain, fat burning and other benefits.

References (Function, Sources, Benefits/Uses and Side Effects/Interactions):

Clark, Josh. “Can Food Make People Happy?”; How Stuff Works; accessed May 13, 2015. <http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/food-happiness1.htm>

Examine.com. “GABA”; published under “Supplements”; accessed May 13, 2015. <http://examine.com/supplements/GABA>

Haas, Ryan. “The Effectiveness of GABA as a Weightlifting Supplement”; published in the “Sports and Fitness” section on Livestrong.com; October 24, 2013. <http://www.livestrong.com/article/442474-the-effectiveness-of-gaba-weight-lifting-supplement>

Hunt Renee. “A List of Foods With the Highest GABA”; published in the “Food and Health” section on Livestrong.com; April 19, 2015. <http://www.livestrong.com/article/478780-a-list-of-foods-with-the-highest-gaba>

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. “GABA (Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid)”; Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database; updated April 9, 2014. <http://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com/nd/Search.aspx?cs=&s=ND&pt=100&id=464&fs=ND&searchid=51623304>

Petroff, Ognen A.C. “GABA and Glutamate in the Human Brain”; Neuroscientist; December 2002. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12467378>

Stellpflug, Craig. “For a Healthy Brain and Nervous System – Gotta Have GABA”; Natural News; August 13, 2012. <http://www.naturalnews.com/036778_GABA_brain_health_nervous_system.html>

WebMD and Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. “GABA (Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid)”; published under “Vitamins & Supplements”; accessed May 13, 2015. <http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-464-gaba%20%28gamma-aminobutyric%20acid%29.aspx?activeingredientid=464&activeingredientname=gaba%20%28gamma-aminobutyric%20acid%29>

Research Sources:

Abdou, Adham M.; S. Higashiguchi; et al. “Relaxation and Immunity Enhancement Effects of Aamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Administration in Humans”; BioFactors; 2006. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16971751>

Cavagnini, Francesco; Giampiero Benetti; et al. “Effect of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid on Growth Hormone and Prolactin Secretion in Man: Influence of Pimozide and Domperidone”; The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism; October 1980. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7419665>

Cavagnini, Francesco; Cecilia Invitti; et al. “Effect of Acute and Repeated Administration of Gamma Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) on Growth Hormone and Prolactin Secretion in Man”; Acta Endocrinologica; February 1980. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7376786>

Cho, Yu Ran; Ji Yoon Chang; and Hae Choon Chang. “Production of β-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) by Lactobacillus Buchneri Isolated from Kimchi and Its Neuroprotective Effect on Neuronal Cells”; Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology; January 2007. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18051360>

Enna, S.J. and Kenneth E. McCarson. “The Role of GABA in the Mediation and Perception of Pain”; Advances in Pharmacology; 2006. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17175808>

Hayakawaa, Kazuhito; Masayuki Kimura; et al. “Effect of a Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid-Enriched Dairy Product on the Blood Pressure of Spontaneously Hypertensive and Normotensive Wistar-Kyoto Rats”; British Journal of Nutrition; September 2004. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15469644>

Kowaka, Emi; Yasuka Shimajiri; et al. “Field Trial of GABA-Fortified Rice Plants and Oral Administration of Milled Rice in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats”; Transgenic Research; December 2014. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25542346>

McCarson, Kenneth E. and S.J. Enna. “GABA Pharmacology: The Search for Analgesics”; Neurochemical Research; October 2014. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24532294>

Munro, Gordon; Rikke R. Hansen; and Naheed R. Mirza. “GABA(A) Receptor Modulation: Potential to Deliver Novel Pain Medicines?”; European Journal of Pharmacology; September 15, 2013. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23500203>

Okita, Yoshimitsu; Harunobu Nakamura; et al. “Effects of Vegetable Containing Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid on the Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System in Healthy Young People”; Journal of Physiological Anthropology; 2009. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19483370>

Powers, M. “GABA Supplementation and Growth Hormone Response”; Medicine and Sport Science; 2012. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23075553>

Powers, Michael E.; Joshua F. Yarrow; et al. “Growth Hormone Isoform Responses to GABA Ingestion at Rest and after Exercise”; Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise; January 2008. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18091016>

Shimada, Morio; Takashi Hasegawa; et al. “Anti-Hypertensive Effect of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)-Rich Chlorella on High-Normal Blood Pressure and Borderline Hypertension in Placebo-Controlled Double Blind Study”; Clinical and Experimental Hypertension; June 2009. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19811362>

Vaz, Gisele Cristiane; Ana Paula Oliveira Bahia; et al. “Cardiovascular and Behavioral Effects Produced by Administration of Liposome-Entrapped GABA Into the Rat Central Nervous System”; Neuroscience; January 29, 2015. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25446344>

Yoshimura, Mineka; Tohru Toyoshi; et al. “Antihypertensive Effect of a γ-Aminobutyric Acid Rich Tomato Cultivar ‘DG03-9’ in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats”; Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry; January 13, 2010. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20050705>




L-Lysine Benefits, Uses, Side Effects and Functions

Discover the Function, Sources and Benefits of the Health Supplement Ingredient L-Lysine, or 2,6-Diaminohexanoic Acid

Lysine – also known as L-lysine, Lys or (S)-2,6-diaminohexanoic acid – is an essential amino acid. This means that while lysine is important for maintaining good health, it is not manufactured by the body; therefore, it must be consumed through dietary sources or supplements. L-lysine can be found in high-protein foods and in select health and bodybuilding supplements, including HGH 30,000 Nanograms pills, HGF MAX, and CytoSport and Multi-Pro whey protein mixes.

Functions of L-Lysine

As an essential amino acid, L-lysine serves as a building block of protein and promotes proper growth. It plays an important role in producing carnitine and forming collagen within the body. Carnitine aids in converting fatty acids into energy and helps to lower cholesterol, while collagen supports bone health and tissue repair, particularly in the case of tendons, cartilage and skin. L-lysine also appears to help the body absorb calcium, and it has antiviral effects. Some evidence suggests it may stimulate human growth hormone (HGH) production, thereby serving as a natural HGH releaser.

Sources of L-Lysine

Dietary sources of L-lysine include protein-rich foods such as red meat, pork, poultry, certain types of fish (such as cod and sardines), eggs and cheese. Plant-based sources include tofu and other forms of soy, nuts and legumes (including beans, peas and lentils). L-lysine may also be consumed in natural dietary supplements.

L-Lysine Benefits and Uses

Some evidence suggests L-lysine acts as a natural HGH releaser, or HGH secretagogue. Because of this potential to stimulate HGH production, L-lysine supplements are often taken to improve athletic performance and enhance muscle growth. Furthermore, lysine’s role in bone health and collagen formation means that it can help athletes recovering from injury by supporting bone and tissue repair.

One of the most common uses of L-lysine leverages its antiviral properties to prevent outbreaks of cold sores and genital herpes resulting from the herpes simplex virus (HSV). It appears to work by blocking the activity of arginine, which stimulates HSV replication. Because L-lysine helps the body absorb calcium and promotes collagen production, researchers believe it may also help prevent bone loss due to osteoporosis.

Side Effects of L-Lysine and Potential Interactions

L-lysine supplements are generally considered safe for adults; no side effects have been reported by healthy users at standard dosages. However, excessive doses may contribute to gallstones or renal dysfunction. Individuals with kidney or liver disease are advised to confer with a doctor before taking L-lysine supplements. In addition, anyone using aminoglycoside antibiotics (such as gentamicin, neomycin or streptomycin) should be aware of possible interaction with L-lysine, which may increase the risk of nephrotoxicity.

More detailed safety information on L-lysine dosages, side effects and interactions can be found on the University of Maryland Medical Center website. As with any medication or health supplement, it is best to consult your physician before taking dietary supplements containing L-lysine.

L-Lysine Research and Studies

Numerous studies have examined the use of L-lysine to treat medical conditions such as the herpes simplex virus (HSV), osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Researchers have reported that L-lysine appears to reduce the occurrence, severity and healing time of HSV infections and to minimize the associated symptoms, including cold sores and mouth ulcers. Animal studies have indicated that L-lysine may be effective in preventing and treating osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease; however, further human studies are needed.

Several studies suggest that L-lysine has the ability to enhance secretion of human growth hormone (HGH), thereby contributing to improved muscle mass and strength. Researchers emphasized that HGH production varied according to such factors as the training status, sex, age and diet of the individual. Many athletes and bodybuilders contend that L-lysine improves performance and strength; and while definitive human studies have yet to be published, animal studies have repeatedly shown that L-lysine produced greater muscularity in swine and other monogastric animals. Other research has examined the effects of L-lysine on wounds, bone fractures and muscle injuries. The findings suggest that lysine plays a positive role in bone and tissue repair; therefore, it may have the potential to help athletes recover from injuries and intense workouts.

For additional L-lysine research, refer to the PubMed site sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

HGH.com Supplements With L-Lysine

Athletes, bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts who wish to reap the benefits of L-lysine can find this essential amino acid in these natural health and bodybuilding supplements from HGH.com:

HGF MAX – Purity Select HGF MAX capsules are formulated to boost HGH production with a proprietary blend of ingredients, including L-lysine and other amino acids. This powerful dietary supplement can help build muscle, improve muscle tone, increase stamina and accelerate metabolism.

HGH 30,000 Nanograms – Purity Select’s popular HGH pills are designed to enhance growth hormone production through a combination of L-group amino acids, including L-lysine. HGH 30,000 Nanograms capsules help support muscle growth, burn fat, boost energy, and provide other health benefits.

CytoSport Vanilla Whey Protein – One serving of low-lactose, low-fat, CytoSport whey protein contains 10 grams of L-lysine and 18 grams of protein. This vanilla-flavored drink mix is intended to help athletes develop lean muscle mass and hasten recovery from intense training.

Multi-Pro Chocolate Whey Protein – With 1.9 grams of L-lysine and 24 grams of protein per serving, this complete protein supplement is formulated to build muscle, decrease body fat and improve immune system health.

Champion Nutrition Amino Shooter + Creatine – This pre-workout drink mix features nine amino acids, including 1,100 milligrams of L-lysine, yet contains no fat, carbs or cholesterol. It is designed to preserve hard-earned muscle while providing added energy for a more effective workout.

References (Function, Sources, Benefits/Uses and Side Effects/Interactions):

Bond, Owen. “What Does Lysine Do for Your Body?”; published in the “Food and Health” section on Livestrong.com; February 2, 2014. <http://www.livestrong.com/article/362472-what-does-lysine-do-for-your-body>

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine. “L-lysine”; Compound Summary for CID 5962 in PubChem Open Chemistry Database; accessed April 27, 2015. <http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/L-lysine>

University of Maryland Shore Regional Health. “Amino Acids”; published in the “Medical Reference Guide” section; last updated April 23, 2014. <http://umm.edu/system-hospital-sites/shore-health/health/medical/ency/articles/amino-acids>

University of Maryland Shore Regional Health. “Lysine”; published in the “Medical Reference Guide” section; last updated May 7, 2013. <http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/lysine>

WebMD and Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. “Lysine”; published under “Vitamins & Supplements”; accessed April 27, 2015. <http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-237-lysine.aspx?activeingredientid=237&activeingredientname=lysine>

Research Sources:

Chromiak, Joseph A. and Jose Antonio. “Use of Amino Acids as Growth Hormone-Releasing Agents by Athletes.”; Nutrition; July/August 2001. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12093449>

Dort, Junio; Nadine LeBlanc; et al. “Beneficial Effects of Cod Protein on Inflammatory Cell Accumulation in Rat Skeletal Muscle after Injury Are Driven by Its High Levels of Arginine, Glycine, Taurine and Lysine”; PLoS One; October 4, 2013. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24124612>

Fini, Milena; Roberto Giardino; et al. “Role of Lactose, Arginine and Lysine Combination in Fracture Healing: An Experimental Study”; Annali Italiani di Chirurgia; January/February 1996. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8712622>

Fini, Melena; Paola Torricelli; et al. “Effect of L-Lysine and L-Arginine on Primary Osteoblast Cultures From Normal and Osteopenic Rats”; Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy; May 2001. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11393808>

Flodin, Nestor W. “The Metabolic Roles, Pharmacology, and Toxicology of Lysine”; Journal of the American College of Nutrition; February 1997. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9013429>

Fürst, Peter. “Dietary L-Lysine Supplementation: A Promising Nutritional Tool in the Prophylaxis and Treatment of Osteoporosis”; Nutrition; January/February 1993 .<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8467115>

Griffith, Richard S.; David E. Walsh; et al. “Success of L-Lysine Therapy in Frequently Recurrent Herpes Simplex Infection: Treatment and Prophylaxis”; Dermatologica; 1987. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3115841>

Liao, Shengfa F.; Taiji Wang; and Naresh Regmi. “Lysine Nutrition in Swine and the Related Monogastric Animals: Muscle Protein Biosynthesis and Beyond”; SpringerPlus; March 27, 2015. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25830085>

Morales-Trejo, Adriana; Héctor García-Villalobos; et al. “Effect of L-Lysine on Expression of Selected Genes, Serum Concentration of Amino Acids, Muscle Growth and Performance of Growing Pigs”; Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition; October 29, 2014. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25354230>

Ozden, Feyza Otan; Ahmet Yasar Turanli; et al. “Clinical Success of Lysine in Association With Serumal and Salivary Presence of HSV-1 in Patients With Recurrent Aphthous Ulceration”; Journal of Experimental and Integrative Medicine; January 2011 <http://www.scopemed.org/?mno=6571>

Shimomura, Akihiro; Isao Matsui; et al. “Dietary l-Lysine Prevents Arterial Calcification in Adenine-Induced Uremic Rats”; Journal of the American Society of Nephrology; March 20, 2014. <http://jasn.asnjournals.org/content/early/2014/03/19/ASN.2013090967.full>

Spallotta, Francesco; Chiara Cencioni; et al. “Enhancement of Lysine Acetylation Accelerates Wound Repair”; Communicative & Integrative Biology; September 2013. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24265859>

Suminski, Richard R.; Robert J. Robertson; et al. “Acute Effect of Amino Acid Ingestion and Resistance Exercise on Plasma Growth Hormone Concentration in Young Men”; International Journal of Sport Nutrition; March 1997. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9063764>

Tomblin, Jr., Frankie A. and Kristy H. Lucas. “Lysine for Management of Herpes Labialis”; American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy; February 15, 2001. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11225166>




L-Ornithine Benefits, Uses, Side Effects and Functions

Discover the Function, Sources and Benefits of the Health Supplement Ingredient L-Ornithine, or (S)-2,5-Diaminopentanoic Acid

Ornithine – also known as L-ornithine, (S)-2,5-diaminopentanoic acid or (S)-alpha,delta-diaminovaleric acid – is a crystalline amino acid. Different sources refer to it as a nonessential or conditionally essential amino acid, which means that it is normally produced by the body in sufficient amounts; however, dietary supplementation may be beneficial in times of illness, injury or stress. L-ornithine is found in some food sources as well as in health and bodybuilding supplements such as HGH 30,000 Nanograms pills and HGF MAX.

Functions of L-Ornithine

Together with arginine and citrulline, ornithine is one of three amino acids that play a key role in the urea cycle. The conversion of arginine into ornithine and ornithine into citrulline increases urea production while lowering ammonia concentrations in the blood. Citrulline subsequently binds with aspartate to form arginosuccinate, which breaks down into free arginine and fumarate; through this process, ornithine is metabolized back into arginine by the liver. Because L-ornithine helps accelerate the excretion of ammonia, it is believed to promote proper liver function, prevent fatigue and enhance performance during prolonged exercise. Evidence also suggests that L-ornithine may stimulate human growth hormone (HGH) production, thereby serving as a natural HGH releaser.

Sources of L-Ornithine

The human body manufactures ornithine from the amino acid arginine as part of the urea cycle. Dietary sources of L-ornithine include protein-rich foods such as beef, chicken, pork, fish, eggs, dairy products, peanuts and soybeans. L-ornithine may also be consumed in natural dietary supplements.

L-Ornithine Benefits and Uses

Among the benefits of ornithine is its ability to detoxify ammonia levels in the bloodstream; because of this function, it can be used to treat hepatic encephalopathy (a brain complication caused by liver disease). It also appears to help reduce fatigue and mitigate the effects of alcohol consumption, improving sleep quality and decreasing negative feelings the next morning. In addition, L-ornithine may promote wound healing, contribute to immune system function, support weight management, reduce stress and improve overall mood. Some evidence suggests L-ornithine acts as a natural HGH releaser, or HGH secretagogue. Because of its ability to boost HGH production and reduce fatigue, L-ornithine supplements are often taken to improve athletic performance, enhance muscle growth and increase endurance.

Side Effects of L-Ornithine and Potential Interactions

L-ornithine supplements are generally considered safe for adults; no serious side effects or drug interactions have been reported at doses of 2 to 6 grams per day. However, excessive doses (more than 10 grams per day) may potentially cause intestinal distress or diarrhea in some users.

More detailed safety information on L-ornithine dosing, side effects and interactions can be found on Examine.com. As with any medication or health supplement, it is best to consult your physician before taking dietary supplements containing L-ornithine.

L-Ornithine Research and Studies

Various research studies have shown that L-ornithine can be used therapeutically for certain medical conditions as well as to enhance overall health, well being and athletic performance. For example, a group of Polish researchers reported that L-ornithine-L-aspartate (LOLA) supplementation has the ability to lower blood ammonia concentration, eliminate symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy associated with liver cirrhosis and stimulate tissue regeneration, while a Japanese study determined that healthy office workers who consumed a combination of caffeine and ornithine had higher mood ratings, less fatigue and better concentration than those who consumed caffeine alone. Japanese researchers also tested the effects of L-ornithine on salivary cortisol, mood and feelings of fatigue the morning after alcohol consumption, and found that L-ornithine supplements lowered cortisol levels, increased sleep length and significantly decreased feelings of fatigue, anger/hostility and confusion.

Study findings published in the Nutrition Journal and Nutrition Research revealed that L-ornithine not only has the potential to relieve stress and improve sleep quality in fatigued office workers, but also to reduce physical fatigue during exercise. Researchers stated that the decrease in physical fatigue is due to L-ornithine’s ability to modulate lipid and amino acid metabolism, thereby increasing the efficiency of energy consumption. Furthermore, a recent animal study published in the Brain Research Bulletin found that L-ornithine reduced body weight, abdominal fat and food intake in rats.

Beyond the research indicating L-ornithine’s potential to reduce fatigue and overall body weight, several studies suggest that it can improve strength and HGH levels. A study published in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness revealed that arginine and ornithine supplementation paired with a high-intensity strength-training program increased total strength and lean body mass in a relatively short period of time. The article also reported that the arginine and ornithine supplements aided in recovery from chronic stress by quelling tissue breakdown, as evidenced by lower urinary hydroxyproline levels. Furthermore, a double-blind study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that ornithine and arginine supplementation increased human growth hormone (HGH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) serum levels after heavy-resistance exercise in strength-trained athletes. While further research is needed, the preliminary findings on L-ornithine supplements show significant promise for improving athletic performance, building muscle and elevating HGH levels.

For additional L-ornithine research, refer to the PubMed site sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

HGH.com Supplements With L-Ornithine

Athletes, bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts seeking to leverage the benefits of L-ornithine can find this amino acid among the ingredients in natural health and bodybuilding supplements from HGH.com:

HGH Pills – Purity Select’s HGH 30,000 Nanograms pills are formulated to boost growth hormone production with a powerful combination of L-group amino acids, including L-ornithine. As one of HGH.com’s best-selling products, these capsules help promote muscle growth, increased energy, fat-burning and other health benefits.

HGF MAX – Scientifically designed to increase HGH production, these Purity Select capsules contain a proprietary blend of ingredients including L-ornithine and other key amino acids. Taking HGF MAX as a dietary supplement can help build muscle, enhance muscle tone, improve stamina and increase metabolism.

References (Function, Sources, Benefits/Uses and Side Effects/Interactions):

Busch, Sandi. “Benefits of L-Arginine and L-Ornithine”; published in the “Nutrition Facts” section on Livestrong.com; July 13, 2014. <http://www.livestrong.com/article/502331-the-benefits-of-l-arginine-ornithine>

Examine.com. “Ornithine”; published under “Supplements”; accessed April 13, 2015. <http://examine.com/supplements/Ornithine>

Marie, Joanne. “What Does the Amino Acid L-Ornithine Do?”; published in the “Alternative Remedies” section on Livestrong.com; May 14, 2014. <http://www.livestrong.com/article/22017-amino-acid-l-ornithine>

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine. “L-ornithine”; Compound Summary for CID 6262 in PubChem Open Chemistry Database; accessed April 13, 2015. <http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/L-ornithine>

Somera, Anna Lisa. “Foods With Ornithine”; published in the “Vitamins and Supplements” section on Livestrong.com; August 16, 2013. <http://www.livestrong.com/article/165604-foods-with-ornithine>

University of Maryland Shore Regional Health. “Amino Acids”; published in the “Medical Reference Guide” section; last updated April 23, 2014. <http://umm.edu/system-hospital-sites/shore-health/health/medical/ency/articles/amino-acids>

WebMD and Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. “Ornithine”; published under “Vitamins & Supplements”; accessed April 13, 2015. <http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-200-ornithine.aspx?activeingredientid=200&activeingredientname=ornithine>

Research Sources:

Demura, Shinichi; Takayoshi Yamada; et al. “The Effect of L-Ornithine Hydrochloride Ingestion on Performance During Incremental Exhaustive Ergometer Bicycle Exercise and Ammonia Metabolism During and After Exercise”; European Journal of Clinical Nutrition; October 2010. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20717126>

Elam, R.P.; D.H. Hardin; et al. “Effects of Arginine and Ornithine on Strength, Lean Body Mass and Urinary Hydroxyproline in Adult Males”; Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness; March 1989. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2770269>

Kokubo, Takeshi; Emiko Ikeshima; et al. “A Randomized, Double-Masked, Placebo-Controlled Crossover Trial on the Effects of L-Ornithine on Salivary Cortisol and Feelings of Fatigue of Flushers the Morning After Alcohol Consumption”; Biopsychosocial Medicine; February 18, 2013. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23414576>

Konishia, Yuuki; Yasutaka Koosaka; et al. “L-Ornithine Intake Affects Sympathetic Nerve Outflows and Reduces Body Weight and Food Intake in Rats”; Brain Research Bulletin; February 2015. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25526897>

Misaizu, Akane; Takeshi Kokubo; et al. “The Combined Effect of Caffeine and Ornithine on the Mood of Healthy Office Workers”; Preventative Nutrition and Food Science; December 2014. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25580405>

Miyake, Mika; Takayoshi Kirisako; et al. “Randomised Controlled Trial of the Effects of L-Ornithine on Stress Markers and Sleep Quality in Healthy Workers”; Nutrition Journal; June 3, 2014. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24889392>

Sikorska, Hanna; Janusz Cianciara; and Alicja Wiercińska-Drapało. “Physiological Functions of L-Ornithine and L-Aspartate in the Body and the Efficacy of Administration of L-Ornithine-L-Aspartate in Conditions of Relative Deficiency” (article published in Polish); Polski Merkuriusz Lekarski; June 2010. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20642112>

Sugino, Tomohiro; Tomoko Shirai; et al. “L-Ornithine Supplementation Attenuates Physical Fatigue in Healthy Volunteers by Modulating Lipid and Amino Acid Metabolism”; Nutrition Research; November 2008. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19083482>

Zajac, Adam; Stanisław Poprzęcki; et al. “Arginine and Ornithine Supplementation Increases Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Serum Levels After Heavy-Resistance Exercise in Strength-Trained Athletes”; Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research; April 2010. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20300016>







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